WILLS & PROBATE

WILLS & PROBATE - HELP FOR YOU

PROPERTY LAWDISPUTE RESOLUTIONPERSONAL INJURYSETTLEMENT AGREEMENTSWILLS & PROBATEMEDIATION
INTRODUCTION
Making a will allows you to plan for the future of your family and protect your assets. If you die without a will, there are certain rules which dictate how your money, property or possessions should be allocated and which may not be the way that you would have wished.
 
If you have children, a will can ensure that appropriate arrangements for the children are made if either one or both parents die.
 
Unmarried partners and partners who have not registered a civil partnership cannot inherit from each other unless there is a will, so the death of one partner may create financial problems for the remaining partner.
 
Where there is a business involved, the need for a will is a vital part of managing the future of the business and the allocation of assets.
ADVANTAGES OF USING A SOLICITOR
There are advantages to using a Solicitor to draw up your will. It is possible to draw up a will yourself, however, the law is complex and if there are errors in the will, this can cause problems after your death. This may result in legal costs, which will reduce the amount of money in the estate.
 
Your estate may be more valuable than you first thought, and using a solicitor will ensure that nothing is overlooked or misunderstood.
 
At ACSL Solicitors, we have the expertise and experience to help you make a will that’s right for you and your family, whatever your circumstances. We offer a personal service and are happy to meet when and where it’s best for you.

‚ÄčOur lead probate solicitor is Gina Stanton.
UNDERSTANDING PROBATE
Probate is the term used when dealing with the Estate of an individual who has died. A person’s Estate is generally made up of money, property and possessions they had at the time of their death. The process involves collecting money that is owed, settling any outstanding debts against the Estate, which remains frozen until the Probate Registry gives authority for the nominated Executor named in the will to divide the estate amongst the beneficiaries. This is known as the Grant of Probate.
 
If there is no Will, a close relative of the deceased can apply to the Probate Registry to deal with the estate. In this case, they apply for a Grant of Letters of Administration. If a grant is given, they are known as the “Administrators” of the estate. Like the Grant of Probate, the Grant of Letters of Administration is a legal document which confirms the Administrator’s authority to deal with the deceased person’s assets.
TOO MUCH TO READ?
You can just call us instead and we will go through the probate process step by step
0151 363 3977

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